Andy Peloquin

I am an artist – words are my palette

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Human Trafficking: Who Suffers Most?

For my upcoming novel “The Death of Lord Damuria” (Feb 2018), I spent a good deal of time researching human trafficking (one of the themes in the novel). My research led me to this fascinating article on Psychology Today:

The Underrecognized Victims of Trafficking: Deaf Women

The article stated, “People with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to human trafficking: Perpetrators like to prey on those who may be less inclined to report abuse. Deaf and hard-of-hearing populations experience abuse about one and a half times more frequently than those without hearing difficulties. Women with disabilities suffer significantly higher rates of domestic violence and sexual assault compared to women without disabilities. They also report abuse that is “more intense” and lasts longer.”

It included some pretty scary statistics:

  • Of 1,300 people rescued from a forced labor camp in China in 2007, roughly 1/3rd were disabled.
  • A report from the UK found that deaf women were TWICE AS LIKELY as non-deaf women to experience domestic abuse

The real problem, according to the article, is that most of the perpetrators of human trafficking of the disabled are caregivers: a family member, neighbors, or residents in their home. The fact that the disabled rely on caregivers and partners for support means they are more vulnerable or susceptible to this type of abuse or trafficking. And, the vulnerability of the disabled people mean they are easier to exploit, thus making them more attractive to the perpetrators of these types of crimes.

Why am I talking about this? Because the discovery of this article sparked a fascinating story idea for me…

One of the novels I planned to work on in 2018 was a follow-up to The Last Bucelarii (Book 1): Blade of the Destroyer, showing what happened to the city after the Hunter destroys the Bloody Hand. Basically the city is plunged into chaos because the Bloody Hand was controlling crime in the city, so the absence of their control leaves a power vacuum, riots, and upheaval—similar to what happens when the powerful head of a drug cartel is removed.

The story was going to be from the perspective of one of the women he frees from the Bloody Hand’s control. This woman was trafficked into the city from elsewhere on the continent, and she finds herself struggling to survive on the streets.

I always knew one of the supporting characters would be her younger sister (10-15 years old). When I ran across the article above, it gave me the perfect idea: the younger sister will be deaf. Not only will this add the element of disability that I like to include in my writing (showcasing how strong people with disabilities can be), but it creates some fascinating situations for the two sisters.  It will also shed light on a problem that exists in the modern world.

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1 Comment

  1. Jesse Magnan

    That is one of the more unnerving things about being disabled is you HAVE to trust at some point, even strangers. That fear of not being bale to fully defend yourself is always there.

    I have an acquaintance who is fully armed at all tomes for that very reason.

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